Archives for posts with tag: children’s book
When I was Born by Isabel Minhos Martins & Madalena Matoso

Coworker Caitlin holds the most beautiful baby book made this year.

Booksellers like myself get excited about a book when it looks pretty, then if the insides end up being awesome, too, we get really uppity. Sometimes we end up foisting it on everyone we see and people start to get tired of it. When it’s a new baby book, it’s hard to be optimistic. So many of them are kind of cliche and syrupy. But when this one came out, “When I was Born,” by Isabel Minhos and illustrated by Madalena Matoso we all gathered around to flip through it. Not only are the pictures beautiful: simple paper cut like shapes, minimal, bright colors and a sense of humor, but the words are wonderful. Which can be woefully rare.

When I was BornThis is what the cover looks like. I recently gave this to a pregnant co-worker, I don’t know, a mere week or two after discovery. That usually doesn’t happen. New baby books are carefully chosen from my vast list. But recently, two of my favorites (Carry Me, by Rosemary Wells and Bittle, by Patricia MacLachlan) have gone out of print.

When I was BornHere are some more pictures. I truly love the way this has been translated; the author speaks Portuguese, I believe.

When I was Born

See that text? That there is gorgeous!

Beautiful Endpapers

Beautiful Endpapers

In other news, I FINISHED MY QUARTER! I’m so excited: to get some sleep (I’ve slept like 2 hours in the last 60), to catch up on my reading and work on all those freelance projects I managed to secure. Accidentally.

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Bad News for Outlaws

Bad News for Outlaws

Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy US Marshal, by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson with illustrations by R. Gregory Christie.

This book is AWESOME. For many reasons. First of all, the content is great. I never heard of Bass Reeves until I was arrested by Christie’s gorgeous illustration of his face on that stark white cover. And what a cover! Look at that badass cover! Pure beauty! I love the interior illustrations as well. R. Gregory Christie, I will be looking at more of your books.

Endsheets are hot.

Endsheets are hot.

Born a slave in 1838, Bass Reeves became “the most feared deputy US marshal that was every heard of.” He was a fast draw, expert marksman, made over 3,000 arrests but killed only 14 people. For the 30 or so years he served, he was the most respected and feared lawman in the territories.

Expert Marksman

The Man Himself

The Man Himself

I love looking through the sections I don’t spend as time with as others, like fiction or picture books, for reasons just like this one. You see something new and are introduced to an historical figure you never heard of before, or a new to you author or illustrator.

In this case, I have to be honest and tell you that this one was on display (and it’s been on display before): it’s Black History Month after all. Maybe you noticed the little sticker on the front of the book? This won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award. Well deserved, I say.