Archives for posts with tag: kitriandtheanimals

So, I know it’s been a long time. I’m sorry. I’ve been working on tweaking/reworking all of my work for this. It’s been hard. And will continue to be so. But I have a super post I’m working on right now. It’s even got a Mo Willems picture book,

Amanda & Her Alligator—detail, girl reading upside down, mo willems

Amanda & Her Alligator—detail

when I (SHOCK AND AWE) don’t always love Mo Willems! Unless he writes about dinosaurs or works with Jon Muth. I know, sacriligious for a bookseller, but what can I say? I think he can be funny, and even is funny (and sweet and charming). But the pigeon books annoy the crap outta me. There, I said it. Sorry, Mo. Hope you’re not reading, and if you are, you can see that I do like many of your books. The new one, Amanda & Her Alligator is one of those. A lot. But I’m getting way ahead of myself, because I wasn’t going to write about that today.

Fake Book Store Collateral

Fake Book Store Collateral

I was going to talk about what I’m doing now. That’s right, I want to talk about me. Me, me, me.

So here’s the list: adding new pieces to old projects, updating logos, perfecting identity pieces, printing so many signatures for the book I redesigned…

Book Redesign Detail

Book Redesign Detail

Even more:  designing two covers for another book, working on a portfolio website, thinking about any pieces I may have missed that should be a part of my portfolio… and working and eating and sleeping.

So later this week, when I have access to all the photos that were going to be in this promised “super post,” I will finish it and you will understand the meaning of the word “super.” Now that I have put large shoes in front of me on the ground, I will try to fill them soon.

This is my new favorite thing. Herve Tullet, author/illustrator, has found a new way to be interactive. Or, to be fair, has rediscovered the way in which books are interactive. They just are. Also, use your imagination. In this world of interactive design: UIUX/ipads/iphones/web saturation, he has poked a little fun, not to take the wind out of anyone’s air balloon, but to remind us that print IS interactive.

Thank you, Chronicle Books, for publishing this beauty.

KNOW HOW SHOP

A poster for the KnowHow Shop in Los Angeles

I’ve still got 3 finals to go, and have a ton to do. But in the meantime, here’s my final poster for my poster design class (not all the posters are up yet, and none of mine are). KnowHow Shop is a cool shared workspace owned by the guys at Popup Design (one of whom is my older brother), a design + build firm. KnowHow decided to go with another design (that I’ll put up soon).

The other day, I was production assistant to my Design School BFF Courtney Comfort. He is interning at Equal Rights Washington, and needed to make a poster for Equality Day, coming up on March 22. (If you pick up a current copy of the Seattle Gay News, you’ll find his half page ad in there, using the same graphic you see here. His first real print ad!)

Naturally he decided to screenprint these. This means: a 3 color run of 60 posters. Which means pulling a squeegee through the thick ink on the screen at least 180 times. During this time, it is necessary to run back and forth bringing wet sheets to the racks to dry, making sure the screen has enough ink on it to pull, etc. I did all that running , etc., not to mention all the prep beforehand. I mixed the inks, which was fun, and prepped the screens. Courtney had the hard jobs: making the film and burning the screens so they would register correctly—and then the printing itself. Registering 3 colors isn’t easy, neither is all that hard work on the hands after designing on a computer all day. You forget how to use your hands. This is why I love this class.

Mixed Inks

Mixed Inks

Final Product!

Final Product!

The posters turned out great, and Courtney’s pulls got better and better as he printed. We were such an efficient team, and it was great fun.

Sometimes I get to help on my own projects! Unfortunately, some of the screens are so long, and I am so short, that it can be hard for me to get a decent pull, which is why I’m glad I have tall friends.

Allerina or Crocodancer

Allerina or Crocodancer

Racquetgull

Racquetgull

Screenprinting is what led me to Graphic Design in the first place; a friend and I taught ourselves from an old Dover title and a kit. I fell in love with printing. From there I learned linocuts, then woodcuts, then monotype, then etching… and then I decided I could do more and applied to SCCA.

Best $15 investment ever.

Bad News for Outlaws

Bad News for Outlaws

Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy US Marshal, by Vaunda Micheaux Nelson with illustrations by R. Gregory Christie.

This book is AWESOME. For many reasons. First of all, the content is great. I never heard of Bass Reeves until I was arrested by Christie’s gorgeous illustration of his face on that stark white cover. And what a cover! Look at that badass cover! Pure beauty! I love the interior illustrations as well. R. Gregory Christie, I will be looking at more of your books.

Endsheets are hot.

Endsheets are hot.

Born a slave in 1838, Bass Reeves became “the most feared deputy US marshal that was every heard of.” He was a fast draw, expert marksman, made over 3,000 arrests but killed only 14 people. For the 30 or so years he served, he was the most respected and feared lawman in the territories.

Expert Marksman

The Man Himself

The Man Himself

I love looking through the sections I don’t spend as time with as others, like fiction or picture books, for reasons just like this one. You see something new and are introduced to an historical figure you never heard of before, or a new to you author or illustrator.

In this case, I have to be honest and tell you that this one was on display (and it’s been on display before): it’s Black History Month after all. Maybe you noticed the little sticker on the front of the book? This won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award. Well deserved, I say.

Where's Waldo?

Where's Waldo?

Ok, yeah. So this exists.I have not shared my intense love of postcard books or postcard collections with you yet. But I’m gonna start now. With this. The brand new Where’s Waldo Postcard Book. I saw it on display when I arrived at work yesterday and got super excited.

The bold type! The rounded corners! LOVE THAT RED!

The cover is, unfortunately, the best part. The insides are a little shiny for my taste…Shiny insidesBut I’m still probably gonna buy it. On a different note, have you tried to find Waldo recently? It is pretty easy now that I’m grown. I always spent forever pouring over those pages when I was a wee one, but now it’s over in a flash. One of the many aspects of growing up.

The End

The End

That’s all for now; I will have to share some more from my postcard book collection some other time.

Lemony & Lisa, sitting in a tree.

K-I-S-S-I-N-G

My excellent friend Anna made this awesome display about authors and illustrators who are in love. It reminded me how much I love this book, to the left here. Not the one on the left, but the one on the right in the picture to the left. Who’s on first? Lisa Brown is married to Daniel Handler, AKA: Lemony Snicket. And it’s no surprise. They both have a strange sense of humor. I prefer Brown’s brand over Handler’s. That’s just me.

How to Be, by Lisa Brown is wonderful. It is sweet, funny and has a good message, but it’s not saccharine or stupid. Here’s a closeup, with a chipmunk puppet, as well as some interior shots.CoverInside, it's so pretty!
How to be a BearHow to be a SnakeAnd last but not least (and the advice on this one is like this: take the best aspects of all the animals I just talked about. Be charming like a snake, loyal like a dog, curious like a monkey—playful like a monkey? But most of all? Be yourself.): How to be a Person.How to be a Person